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what does a thyroid do?

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asked Oct 14, 2013 in Aging by anonymous
   

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The function of the thyroid gland is to take iodine, found in many foods, and convert it into thyroid hormones:thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).  Thyroid cells are the only cells in the body which can absorb iodine.  These cells combine iodine and the amino acid tyrosine to make T3 and T4.  T3 and T4 are then released into the blood stream and are transported throughout the body where they control metabolism (conversion of oxygen and calories to energy).  Every cell in the body depends upon thyroid hormones for regulation of their metabolism. The normal thyroid gland produces about 80% T4 and about 20% T3, however, T3 possesses about four times the hormone "strength" as T4.
answered Oct 15, 2013 by stan Inquisitive Expert (14,620 points)

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